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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 353 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be declared in a
in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the events that took place in
, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
's iraq, the first shia arab led state in history is iraq, but we never mention that. the united states cannot come to terms with the fact today that for the first time america and one of america's key regional pillars, egypt, is in place strategically. you doesn't mean they have to become pro-iranian. they are just in play. they're no longer reflective pro-american the iranian military the first time in 30 years can go through the suez. iran doesn't need syria anymore. american elites have a very hard time coming to terms with these facts. and an even harder time coming to terms with the reality that the arab awakening is accelerating erosion of american standing and position in the middle east, not iran's. but rather than face this reality, americans embrace, particularly elites here in washington, embrace the logic defined proposition that the same drivers of political change and powering islamists in arab countries will somehow transform the islamic republic into a secular liberal state. it is a logic defying proposition. still, reality is what it is. on the eve of 9/11, just over 1
>>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. the debates have done, the race is heading for the final stretch, and it is still all about the economy. so we'll start with a great panel it to see talk about the american economy, who is actually going on. >>> then, you've often heard that fracking is controversial. why? we have a debate to help you think it through. >>> and do you think you have enough money? what would be enough? we'll have a fascinating discussion on the subject with lord robert skidelsky, britain's most prominent economic historian o how to answer those questions. >>> and why in the world did the nation of mali get more mention this week in the debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy roading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coincidentally
is not fixed then it is time we change presidents and elect mitt romney the next president of the united states. tonight the forecast is that the president will win 287 electoral college votes. ari, the national polls are different on who has what lead by how much. but it is the battleground states. that lead is impressive. and there is a sizable lead in ohio and i'm aware of what you nailed in your rewrite the other night. >> tell me. >> what should these undecided voters have so much power? >> there is a funny thing happening. it is moving to a mobilization model. and what we are seeing now is, and we are seeing mobilization mez sages to the base. they are saying you have to get people excited. we are seeing a bullish attitude. and they don't need to focus as much on persuading. they are kicking into a gotv mode now. >> let's take a look at something put out today. new video with sara silverman which is about getting out the vote. >> in college mitt romney was so poor at harvard he had to sell stocks to get by. did you have to sell stocks to get by in college liz? >> no, i sold plasma in coll
. a lot of people i've heard about the trade conflict between the united states and china on solar panels. this is an interesting prism to view the chinese economy more broadly because this is a classic case of china really pushing hard for big innovation and winding up with little innovation that doesn't get them to where they want to go and part of china's innovation policy is targeting strategic emerging industries. these are the industries that beijing thinks will be the industry's of the future. the biggest is green energy including solar and wind and electric vehicles and other green energy technologies so they have unleashed a lot of funding to support grain energy innovation. most of that funding has created instead of mosul products continuing the same old model process innovation which is making the products created in the west faster and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are subs
in los angeles. william? >> well, shepard, these weapons sold in the united states and smuggled south continue to produce a staggering body count in mexico. brian terry was one victim. but now univision the spanish language network produced a bombshell documentary that puts a human face on this american scandal with guns traced to fast and furious killed 18 drug rehab center in juarez late in 2009. months later the cartel hit mass cerd 16 at a teenager's birthday party. >> they feel helpless. they don't know what to do and they say who is going to pay for this? by cross-referencing weapons weapons sold in mexico. hundreds of fatalities to the u.s. program. while the mexican government has offered little criticism of the u.s. administration from which it receives hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. the victims are hoping to find justice in u.s. courts. >> go and sue in the united states with these american lawyers. >> now attorney general eric holder did not fire anyone for fast and furious. we are told reviews internally are underway for about a dozen officials. inspector general
there will be changes in the united states senate, if tim is in, he will be in there for the same folks he's campaigning for all of these years when he was chair of the democratic national committee, ignoring the needs, dire needs of people in virginia. i want to see change in washington, those positive, constructive ideas that can get this country going in the right direction. i believe we ought to get united behind the mission of sending a message to the world that america is open for business again. i think that anybody who pays taxes should be on our side unless you want to pay higher taxes. if you use electricity, you ought on our side. if you want more affordable electricity. if you drive a car and don't like the fact you're paying over $30 more every time you fill up, you ought to be on our side. if you agree with me doctors and patients ought to be making health care decisions rather then panels of bureaucrats up in washington, you ought to be on our side. if you're working for a living or if you want a job, the approach i have been advocating has proven to work. over 300,000 net new jobs create
look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to build a true alliance, that he w
to iran in terms of views of the united states. so there's a very different dynamic on the ground among libyan youth. notwithstanding what we're seeing in the news. um, and i thought the uprising in benghazi was hugely a success, important to think about when 30,000 people rose up a few weekends ago to throw out islamist militias. the population once again taking control of the situation where a dysfunctional government wasn't able to. and i found the intervention very interesting because in many ways i think the main bogeyman was not the islamist militias, but the fear of what the 30,000 would do if things got much worse. which brings up another thing that i should have said in the introductory remarks, the arab spring, the dynamic, we view it as people against regimes, but just as important is regimes against regimes and people against people, and i'm happy to talk about those in the q&a, but it's not just people against regimes. following benghazi, a well known libyan academic said something which stuck with me. he said libyans have no idea where they're going, but they're going to g
security threat to the united states and to israel. that's why i authorized the most crippling sanctions one country has ever eleven individual against another against iran. the results of that we just saw in news reports this week their currency devalued by 40%. the shipments of oil dramatically reduced hurting their economy. those sanctions i co-authorized is to create an economic news to deter them from seeking nuclear weapons. so i believe these sanctions still have time. it is been suggestioned the time clock is sometime next year. if these sanctions cripple their economy, i think we can deter them. >> well, that all sounds just fine but unfortunately, it doesn't appear that the sanctions are working. too little, too late and it's a very critical time for our country and for the world at large. and so i know that as a member of the senate, i'm going to do everything humanly possible through my vote, through advocacy and in every other way to make sure that iran never, never gets a nuclear weapon. this is the greatest threat to our country and to the world. and i just hope that the f
this has citizens, i live in europe, you live in the united states of america and we all know the problem we have with our democracies now is not the decision of religions, but some decisions of transnational cooperation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to do anything. in democracy we are still dealing with powers that are beyond the democracy procedure. banks, transnational corporations, and we're facing with people are deciding. in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats are coming to solve the problem. we never elected them. but money is choosing them. so we also have to deal with the simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from state, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on the state which is also imposing decision on to us as citizens. so this idealization of the western democracy model i would say be cautious. we all have to do with problems and prices from within. so i wouldn't push the arab world to follow blindly the western model, but to be very critical and to try to take the best from the other models into dra
muslims, not have them isolate the united states of america. i know i can do a better job in iraq. i have a plan to have a summit with all of the allies, something this president has not yet achieved, not yet been able to do to bring people to the table. we can do a better job of training the iraqi forces to defend themselves, and i know that we can do a better job of preparing for elections. all of these, and especially homeland security, which we'll talk about a little bit later. >> mr. president, you have a 90- second rebuttal. >> i, too, thank the university of miami, and say our prayers are with the good people of this state, who've suffered a lot. september the 11th changed how america must look at the world. and since that day, our nation has been on a multi-pronged strategy to keep our country safer. we pursued al qaida wherever al qaida tries to hide. seventy-five percent of known al qaida leaders have been brought to justice. the rest of them know we're after them. we've upheld the doctrine that said if you harbor a terrorist, you're equally as guilty as the terrorist. and the t
personal connection. we'll explain. >>> and the most affordable cities to live in the united states. is yours one of them? >>> good morning. i'm lynn berry. after the third debate between president obama and republican nominee mitt romney, there are just 14 days left before american voters choose their next president. according to a cbs news instant polls on uncommitted voters, president obama was a clear 2-1 victor with 53% saying he won. governor romney got 23%. 24% called it a tie. a cnn orc international poll called the debate closer, with 48% saying obama won while 40% picked obama. for more we go to nbc's steve handlesman who's in florida for us. steve, good morning. >> reporter: hi, lynn. thanks. good morning from boca raton, florida. the debate here last night was clearly the most combative so far. though surprising to some, not on the issue of libya. mitt romney was able to make his larger point, his claim that america is weaker now overseas than it was four years ago. mitt romney and barack obama came to their third and final debate tied in national polls, but their tv aud
the united states government or any other organization i'm a part of, and therefore, now, i can be a troublemaker. i'm focusing on the countries of egypt, libya, and tunisia, and focus more on egypt because i spent 20 years on the country, lived there for six years, and there for six weeks during the summer time. algeria and morocco have been peaceful, but don't count on it. algeria and libya or net oil exporters to help them get on their feet if they do not focus too much on that. as the ambassador said, libya's back to 1.4 million barrels a day, almost miraculous given the countries that have gone through things like this. algeria produces about the same amount of oil as libya, but it has six times the people so there's a lot more people to spread that across. algeria produces 2.3 cubic feet of gas a year, and if you do the math, it's a billion cubic feet per person in both countries, and if distributed nicely, everyone would be well-off, but we all know that's not the way it is. egypt is a net oil importer. it is a gas exporter, but right now, mostly lng because the pipelines
ago you told the "desert sun" that it was in our best interest that the united states remain in both iraq and afghanistan. last months you told the veterans that if president obama couldn't outline a clear and concise explanation of why troops remain in afghanistan, then the u.s. should "get the hell out." what prompted such a change in perspective, and if the u.s. pulled out immediately, how do you address concern that the enemy will fill the void? >> let me go back to a little bit more thorough reporting than that. and the article is there. but what i did say is as long as president obama cannot articulate to the american people why we are there and what we are doing, but allowing our troops to flounder because he feels comfortable because he has given a timeline for withdrawal, that troubles me greatly. under this presidential leadership, yes, i am concerned about our troops being deployed in afghanistan, absolutely. but you know what else troubles me about this timeline of president obama's, which is an arbitrary political timeline? he didn't get that from the generals, he got it
comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in terms of authors's a
balance of power and how it impacts you here in the united states. >>> also, lance armstrong loses those seven cycling titles that made him a legend. es, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. 100 calories... [ c♪ef ] ma'am (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. zimplt welcome
.s. ambassador and three others. republicans have criticized the united states ambassador to the united nations and other officials for saying that the attack likely stemmed from a protest. according to the reporting of the "wall street journal", the c.i.a. daily intelligence updates did not rule it out until accept 22 despite officials at office of the director of national intelligence who said by september 15 a protest had nothing to do with the attack. that is the top story. ed henry is live on it. the debate tonight is supposed to be about foreign possibility and the president has been playing a lot of defense on the libya attack. >>reporter: no doubt. foreign policy was to be a slam dunk between getting osama bin laden to the fact that mitt romney has stumbles on the one big overseas trip. you can see in recent weeks this has taken a turn. our latest polling in ohio, for example, who do you trust better to handle foreign policy? the president took a dip from september to now because of the terror attack, from 53 percent to 49 percent and mitt romney going up two points. in florida, the pre
and they can say that the president of the united states and united states of america has stood on the right side of history. >> brian: with the arab spripping nothing positive. >> steve: i was amazed romney didn't bring up the muslim brotherhood ledd to extremist back in power. >> but the women's vote in the debate. one of the big things romney accomplished talking about how he is peace love not support war and he didn't think we needed to go to war in iran or send froopps in syria and all of that stuff was to debunk the idea the idea that he is a warmongered. women were worried he was a bush 43 shoot fromm the hip and he over that. the main thing that happened last night was not foreign policy. romney won the economic debate . obama's view on the economy is ridiculouss and doesn't defend his record well i think it will continue. rumny's momentum to the nomination. i think it will be unslackened and accelerate and more confident than ever we will have rum rhumb will have a land slide. 48 percent in the popular and 300 to 350 in the electoral vote. >> brian: out on a limb. >> i live on the l
, standing up in iran, with the backing of united states. that could have been counterproductive. as a result, the obama administration was pretty silent. at the time now where romney is going after him on that, i think there were a few areas where there were some significant differences, but on the whole, after you get through some of the angry rhetoric, there is a lot of agreement between obama and romney, one area of disagreement on arming the syrian rebels. another area of disagreement, how far will iran be able to go in its nuclear weapons capability, the capability of developing a bomb as opposed to actually having a bomb. and the third was on russia. he twice in a speech singled out vladimir putin as a basically a foe of the united states and he was doubling down on those controversial remarks. he made a few months ago, that russia was america's number one geostrategic foe. >> interesting on syria, i was listening to fareed zakaria, he noted the passive voice. we're wall for it as you mentioned, the foreign policy debate in two weeks. wolf blitzer, we'll talk next hour. i have more que
. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> narrator: miles romney had five wives and 30 children. >> they built a ranch and he's back in stone age conditions with no money. romney's father is now on the scene. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the core of your personality is something
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 353 (some duplicates have been removed)